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Learn more about the PhD Program in Photophysics of Synthetic and Biological Multichromophoric Systems within the BayNAT Graduate School

A system is called a “Multichromophore” when it consists of several units that can interact with light. Typical examples for Multichromophores can be found in the realm of conjugated organic molecules. Multichromophoric systems play a prominent role in processes of considerable practical importance, such as biological light harvesting, technological efforts to build organic solar cells, and molecular electronics in general. At the same time they are of great fundamental interest because they feature some of the most important general concepts from condensed matter physics and chemistry.

Science across disciplinary borders

Progress in this field requires truly interdisciplinary efforts, combining concepts, knowledge, and techniques from various sciences. The interaction between physics and chemistry is of particular importance.

Additional qualifications and interdisciplinary training profile

The PhD program in Photophysics of Synthetic and Biological Multichromophoric Systems has the declared aim of offering a special qualification program to young researchers, enabling them to work successfully in this field with its particular requirements and challenges.

The interdisciplinary training program comprises special lectures and seminars, special workshops and conference support, and a selection of science-related soft-skill modules. In addition the program supports international collaboration through a visitor program and travel scholarships, and makes a special effort to promote women in science.


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Last modified: 1 February 2011, Copyright © University of Bayreuth - All rights reserved.